Where To Hit Starter With Hammer: Does Banging Help A Failed Starter?

Are you trying to get your car to start, but it fails? You might have a bad starter! There is a famous mouth-spread workaround for this – hammering your starter. Now, you may question where to hit starter with hammer.

If you’re wondering the same thing, today’s post might be for you! Driverevolve will also teach you the signs of a bad starter, its causes, and the replacement cost!

Can I Fix A Starter With A Hammer?

Yes.

When fixing faulty starters using a hammer, though, somebody must keep the key in the starting mode while another person works on the starter. And since this method is temporary, you should not count on it as a long-term fix. You should only apply this method in an emergency.

Where To Hit Starter With Hammer

We suggest lightly pounding on the side of your starter with a hard tool for a few minutes to get your engine running. Sometimes lightly hitting it might effectively solve the problem as it reconnects the starter’s inner parts, such as electrical cables, restoring their functionality.

Remember when your TV is defective, you tap it, and everything works again? The same holds here.

Bad Starter Symptoms: What Does A Bad Starter Sound Like? 

A functional starter will make a rhythmic whirring sound when we start our vehicle. The speed changes as our starter crank the vehicle engine against compression, generating this cyclic sound. You’ll get used to this after a few months of car usage. 

A defective starter will produce different noises that indicate something is wrong.
A bad starter will make “weird” sounds. – Car Treatments 

A defective starter will produce different noises that indicate something is wrong.

  • Silence: Nothing happens when you turn your key or push the button. There isn’t any sound. In this case, it might be due to an issue with the starting, starter solenoid, or another electrical component.
  • High-Speed Whirring Noise: Your starter is not reaching your flywheel – it’s just circling around. In this case, there could be a solenoid or Bendix drive issue. Otherwise, your flywheel ring gear might lack a gear tooth.
  • Grinding or Clattering Sound: Your starter engages the ring gear partly but not wholly, causing an engine failure. If you continuously turn your ignition keys off and on (or push the power button), your starter may start engaging and run your engine.

What Causes A Starter To Fail?

Age 

The passage of time and continuous usage weaken everything, even your vehicle’s starter. And it’s also the most prevalent reason for starter failures in general.

Most vehicles require starter change after 160,000 to 200,000 kilometers due to deterioration.

Cold Winter Climates

Cold temperatures accelerate the aging of your starter since your engine has to work much harder to ignite when the outside temperature is cold. Parked vehicles outside every night in temps far below zero are examples of this.

Vehicles exposed to freezing settings might benefit immensely from an engine core heater. Call a qualified service expert if it is necessary.
 Cold climates can also cause a starter failure. – Ride Time  

Vehicles exposed to freezing settings might benefit immensely from an engine core heater. Call a qualified service expert if it is necessary.

Abusive Starting Techniques 

When additional issues cause your engine to be problematic or cease to ignite, a starter might experience extensive damage. If your engine does not start immediately, don’t leave your starter running for a long time. Such actions will burn your starter, perhaps causing internal electrical damage. 

In such cases, it is advisable that your starter operates for over 5 to 7 secs. Then, stop for at least 15 secs to cool down. It is recommended that you do this 4 times in a row.

Leave your starter to rest for a few minutes. For more information, see your car’s handbook.

Engine Oil Leaks Onto the Starter

Due to leaks, oil can reach your starter casing and ruin your engine shaft commutator zone. This weakens your starter’s ability to spin your engine.

You should have a mechanic examine the oil leakage beneath your vehicle's engine for potential hazards to other components such as the starter. Whether there is oil in your spark plug well, engine, or piston, you must fix it immediately.
Oil leaks onto your starter are also a common cause. – Corvette Forum 

You should have a mechanic examine the oil leakage beneath your vehicle’s engine for potential hazards to other components such as the starter. Whether there is oil in your spark plug well, engine, or piston, you must fix it immediately.

Driving Through Deep Water 

You should never risk driving your car in deep. If the water level is high enough, it can drown your starter and trigger mechanical damage, resulting in starter failures or, worse, a water-locked engine.

If you must travel into deep water due to a downpour, a thorough checkup of your vehicle for water problems is advisable.

How Much Does A Starter Replacement Cost? 

Depending on the vehicle’s brand, model, and year, changing the starter can vary from reasonably affordable to highly pricey.

How much does a starter cost? Expect to pay between $125 and $165 for service and $250 to $375 for a replacement starter on a low-cost car or 4-door. 

Expect to shell out more for a starter change on high-end vehicles. Labor might be $300 and above, and start-up charges can start at $750.

These are the costs for brand new items. 

However, adopting a reconditioned (reman) starter might reduce this price by 30% to 40%. The reduced price of reman components is an advantage, but the warranty is typically not as good as that of a new item.
Reman starters are much more affordable. – Amazon

However, adopting a reconditioned (reman) starter might reduce the expense by 30% to 40%. The reduced price of reman components is an advantage, but the warranty is typically not as good as that of a new item. 

Also, the starter replacement cost will likely exclude your flywheel repair or ring gear replacement. And sadly, such issues usually accompany starter failures, especially on older vehicles with over 150,000 km driven.

Thus, expect to add $1,000 (or above) to the overall cost of changing your starter for the flywheel and ring gear repairs.

Wrapping Up 

Now you know where to hit starter with hammer so it can work again. However, remember that it’s only a short-term fix and could not touch the problem’s root. In the long run, it could also cause further damage; thus, get your vehicle serviced if you notice frequent engine failures or strange engine sounds.

For extra car tips and advice, visit our Fun Driving section

 

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