Car Turns Off While Driving But Turns Back On: 7 Potential Culprits And The Best Fixes 

My car turns off while driving but turns back on after a while!

We understand how irritating and dangerous (especially if you are on a highway or traveling at high velocities) that might be! And at the end of the day, when you finally get back to your house, the culprits behind that phenomenon might still hunt you (and that’s probably why you are here).

But wonder no more! Today, Driverevolve will introduce 7 potential culprits that cause your car’s sudden stall when traveling and the best fixes in each case!

  1. Bad Crankshaft Position Sensor

A defective crankshaft position sensor is among the most likely causes of vehicles shutting down while driving. The crankshaft position sensor monitors the car’s mechanical components, such as the driveshaft, motor cylinders, and plungers. It supervises the motion and position of the crankshaft to aid in gas injection and combustion timing.

The placement of your crankshaft position sensor differs from car to car. As it must be near your crankshaft, it is usually on the front undersurface of your motor. On a few models, it is fixed to the scheduling lid or installed at the back or side of the engine.
The crankshaft position sensor can shut your car down unexpectedly. – Road Sumo  

In short, this system is critical to your car’s performance. A malfunctioning crankshaft position detector won’t deliver the ECU with accurate data about the valve placement in the motor, making a cylinder malfunction.

If your crankshaft position detector fails to function correctly, the piston’s warning light will show up. The rev counter not operating correctly is yet another defective symptom of your crankshaft position sensor.

If your crankshaft position detector fails to function correctly, the piston’s warning light will show up. The rev counter not operating correctly is yet another symptom of a faulty crankshaft position sensor.

The rev counter is the measure on your center console that tells your vehicle’s RPMs. It is usually placed next to your speedometer. When users rev their motor, the rev counter goes up. When the desired velocity is reached, the rev counter will remain unchanged.

The ECU would then transmit data to the rev counter after acquiring details about motor velocity from the crankshaft position detector. Thus, if the crankshaft position detector fails, it sends inaccurate and inappropriate information to the ECU, subsequently reported back, causing the rev counter to begin functioning unpredictably or intermittently.

If you’re on the road and your car suddenly dies due to this reason, try a temporary fix for crankshaft position sensor

  1. Faulty Engine Control Unit

A defective Engine Control Unit (ECU) or control system subsystem is another cause of cars shutting down while driving and a lit warning light on the dashboard.

The ECU in your vehicle is a microcontroller that picks up data from different components of an inbuilt ignition motor to ensure that all of the mechanism is functioning optimally and precisely to optimize your car’s performance.

A malfunctioning ECU might result in abrupt cuts in force, gas mileage, and ignition failure, making your vehicle shut down and restart at unexpected times. 

Another sign of a defective ECU is your automobile resetting and twitching while traveling. The engine warning light on your dashboard may also show up.
Your ECU may also cause the problem. – NV Motorsport UK

 Another sign of a defective ECU is your automobile resetting and twitching while traveling. The engine warning light on your dashboard may also show up.

In the worst case, a bad ECU might make your car shut off while driving and won’t start again. Dangerous it is; still, most people don’t acknowledge the problem until it happens.

Sadly, checking and examining your ECU is a tricky process that requires experts. However, if you prefer to do your own repair work, the only thing you could try is to use an OBD device to view what screening trouble codes you receive.

That being said, the code for a malfunctioning ECU may still be confusing. You have no choice but to bring it to a competent repairer. A maintenance specialist will have the necessary devices, software, and knowledge to troubleshoot your ECU.

  1. Malfunctioning Alternator

The alternator in your vehicle is responsible for generating a steady flow of power supply. This electricity is used to power numerous electrical components such as the dashboard, dome lighting fixtures, air conditioner, or audio system and to recharge the batteries.

If your alternator is not working correctly, your automobile won’t receive the electricity it requires, resulting in the car shutting down while driving. A flicker dash is one of the symptoms of a defective alternator.

These rotating electromagnets yield alternating current (AC), which is afterward routed to the rectifier of your alternator. This same rectifier transforms the alternating current electricity into direct current electricity, which powers your vehicle's electrics.
The alternator supplies electricity to all electrical parts.- Auto-Howstuffworks

 It’s worth noting that if your batteries are working correctly and can deliver electricity after your alternator fails, your vehicle can still operate for a few minutes without an alternator; therefore, you may not immediately notice what’s going on.

However, because the battery is not created to energize the whole machine, it can only operate for a short time. When your battery fails, your automobile will halt and ultimately shut down.

If you pay heed to how your vehicle works, you should be able to tell when an alternator is malfunctioning, as your automobile will start to collect sporadic electricity.

Regardless, a simple home upkeep task is utilizing a digital multimeter to periodically examine your batteries and alternator, perhaps after 4-6 months.

In case of a faulty alternator, seek professional help!

  1. Defective Fuel Gauge

You may be shocked to discover that countless individuals have their vehicles shut down while traveling annually because of an unfilled gas tank. While a few people are too hectic or scatterbrained to check the gas reservoir and top it up as the car runs out, there are times when your gas meter has been faulty and does not display the actual gas amount in the tank.

A transmitting device collapse is among the most likely causes of a defective fuel meter. In most situations, this will induce your gas meter to become locked in one place regardless of the gasoline amount, usually at the "F" or "E" label.
Check whether your fuel gauge is still working properly. – Your Mechanic 

A transmitting device collapse is among the most likely causes of a defective fuel meter. In most situations, this will induce your gas meter to become locked in one place regardless of the gasoline amount, usually at the “F” or “E” label.

If you think your gas meter or fuel amount detector is malfunctioning, try filling one jug or 3 liters of fuel and seeing if your engine works again.

  1. Jammed Or Faulty Fuel Pumps Or Fuel Mechanisms

It is common for a poor fuel pump to cause your vehicle to shut down while traveling and then unexpectedly switch back on. Your motor requires a precise amount of gasoline at a specific time as a signal for the combustor to produce electricity, and the fuel pumps are the component that delivers the proper volume of gas to the motor.

If your vehicle does not receive the proper volume of gas at the appropriate time, it will shut down, comparable to when your automobile is out of fuel. The harsh reality is that if your fuel pump fails, there is no way to get around it. You’ll have to repair it or install a new one.

Another possibility is that your gas filtration has been jammed. The fuel filter's duty is to purify the gasoline in the motor. It can become gummed up after extended use by contaminated particles in old fuel, preventing the fuel pumps from pumping enough fuel via it, impairing the vehicle's capability to generate electricity, and causing your car to shut down while traveling.
Your fuel filters might be clogged. – Car Bibles

 Another possibility is that your gas filtration has been jammed. The fuel filter’s duty is to purify the gasoline in the motor. It can become gummed up after extended use by contaminated particles in old fuel, preventing the fuel pumps from pumping enough fuel via it, impairing the vehicle’s capability to generate electricity, and causing your car to shut down while traveling.

If your fuel filters are nylon or paper, simply change them, which is affordable. If it’s manufactured from metal, thoroughly wash and reuse it.

Most of the time, fuel pumps are housed within the gas reservoir. Smacking the gas reservoir with your leg is an excellent way to see if your fuel pump is to blame for your car shutting down while driving. 

If your engine starts again, the issue is probably with your fuel pumps. But don’t hit it too hard with a hard tool since this tank is manufactured from plastic, and you don’t want to deform it.

Since the fuel system is a crucial and complicated component, it’s best to leave the repair work to an expert.

  1. Defective Ignition Switch

My car shuts off when I stop, or my car turns off while driving but turns back on afterward! If this is your problem, you might experience a defective ignition switch!

When you start the engine to drive the vehicle, it activates the igniting system. Numerous small metal panels within the ignition switch might corrode over time.

Once this occurs, one of those panels may become disconnected, turning the burner off. Alternatively, the ignition signal may fail, and the mechanism that regulates the amount of power flowing through them will cease to function. These will induce the motor to shut down suddenly while traveling.
Your ignition switch might be faulty. – Oards Automotive Hub 

Once this occurs, one of those panels may become disconnected, turning the burner off. Alternatively, the ignition signal may fail, and the mechanism that regulates the amount of power flowing through them will cease to function. These will induce the motor to shut down suddenly while traveling.

Fortunately, it’s pretty simple to determine whether a defective ignition switch is the cause of your vehicle shutting down while traveling. Check for any signals on your center console after the car shuts off.

If your center console indicator ceases working, a malfunctioning ignition switch is highly probable. After the vehicle has stopped working, insert your keys back in the car and start turning them. 

If this does not propel the vehicle, the problem is often an ignition collapse. In this case, bring it to a reliable repair center and let the expert handle your car.

  1. Bad Spark Plugs

The small spark plugs are another critical part that enables your motor to make electricity. They are the components that burn the air-fuel combination in the engine’s combustor, resulting in fuel burning. Every piston has a separate spark plug.

If you only get one defective spark plug, you might still proceed and use your automobile. If many spark plug fails at once, your vehicle may initiate, but it will most likely not go far. Having defective spark plugs will force your motor to halt and shut down while running.
Your spark plugs might be to blame. – Mobil 

If you only get one defective spark plug, you might still proceed and use your automobile. If many spark plug fails at once, your vehicle may initiate, but it will most likely not go far. Having defective spark plugs will force your motor to halt and shut down while running.

If you suspect you have malfunctioning spark plug signs, it’s relatively simple to ascertain whether you’ve got a poor spark plug: simply find and check them. A defective spark plug is one that has blisters from overheating, or there are substances contaminated with them (for example, oil in the spark plug well).

If you have bad or contaminated spark plugs, clean or replace them!

Wrapping Up 

My car turns off while driving but turns back on afterward! Now, you’ve grasped why it happens and what to do in each situation. Although there are many DIY workarounds or instructions on how to deal with this specific issue, it’s best to have your car checked by an expert. There might be several problems happening at the same time!

For more content like this, visit our Fun Driving section

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.