Water Coming Out Of Exhaust: 6 Most Common Reasons Why It’s There 

If you’ve noticed water coming out of exhaust, you may question if this is cause for concern. While water dripping under car is common in most cases, there are a few exceptions where it could be severe. In today’s post, Driverevolve will discuss the 6 most common causes for this phenomenon, what to do, and estimated costs. 

6 Common Causes Of Liquid Coming Out Of Exhaust 

If you notice that your tailpipe is oozing water, this simply means that there is a leakage in your exhaust system.

If you’re unsure of your skills, it’s a good idea to get your car thoroughly checked and investigated by a competent repairman. In the worst case, leaving the issue without examining it may exacerbate the problem and result in a heavier paycheck.

In most cases, it’s not a big deal. Often, the worst-case situation is that you’ll have to change various parts, which will cost a few hundred dollars. The below sections will go over some of the most common reasons for water leakage from the tailpipe from ordinary to extreme conditions.

Engine Heat Condensation

If you live in cold conditions or it’s wintertime, you might expect to see water leaking from your tailpipe. 

Generally, your car’s parts take a while to permit the oil to circulate and effectively cool them.

In the meantime, the vehicle’s operating parts will produce significant heat in the first few seconds of execution. Therefore, the exhaust device will be scorching. Water steam results from the high temperatures mashing up with the cold atmosphere. 

So you'll start noticing tiny drops and what appear to be grayish fumes heading out of the exhaust. After a few minutes of operating, such problems will automatically disappear, returning your car’s exhaust to its normal condition.
Engine heat condensation might cause water drops out of the tailpipe. – RAC  

So you’ll start noticing tiny drops and what appear to be grayish fumes heading out of the exhaust. After a few minutes of operating, such problems will automatically disappear, returning your car’s exhaust to its normal condition.

Water Condensation

When you run your motor, the inbuilt combustion operation creates a mix of moisture and CO2. This combination is significantly easier to spot after the engine has been properly cooled and the emissions have escaped the motor’s ignition compartment.

You might even notice water drops coming from your tailpipe at this stage. This is normal, and you should not be concerned or bring your car to an expert.

Catalytic Converter 

The catalytic converter is essential to your vehicle’s tailpipe. As toxic pollutants exit the engine, it dilutes them. In other words, the catalytic converter minimizes the environmental impact of exhaust gasses.

However, trace moisture levels might arise while your converter lowers and converts dangerous gasses into a safe byproduct. Such gasses consolidate into tiny drops, which exit through the tailpipe. Likewise, these water drops are harmless; there is no reason to be concerned.
A catalytic converter might also cause the above condition. – Vehicle Freak 

However, trace moisture levels might arise while your converter lowers and converts dangerous gasses into a safe byproduct. Such gasses consolidate into tiny drops, which exit through the tailpipe. Likewise, these water drops are harmless; there is no reason to be concerned.

Broken Head Gasket

In a few cases, water drops may appear in your exhaust system due to a blown head seal. This indicates a problem that you must address immediately.

It is simple to separate this condition from other causes of water particle formation. A broken head seal causes white fumes to be discharged from the tailpipe. You will also recognize air pockets in your coolant storage tank.

Another vital clue of a failing head seal is frequent overheating, which requires immediate attention. Failure to do so could result in more risk.
Blown head gaskets also leave drops under the exhaust. – Mechanic Base 

Another vital clue of a failing head seal is frequent overheating, which requires immediate attention. Failure to do so could result in more risk.

For instance, engine failure is a natural consequence of overheating. As a result, whenever you notice any of the signs above, you must immediately seek the advice of a technician.

Faulty Piston Rings

If defective piston rings induce water to leak from your tailpipe, the consequences could be severe. If your piston rings are the culprit, you’ll recognize white fumes and liquid coming out of the tailpipe.

If your problem is extreme, the car interior will smell like it's on fire. That, or it might be a sweet scent indicating a more severe case.
A faulty piston ring. – Car Treatment 

If your problem is extreme, the car interior will smell like it’s on fire. That, or it might be a sweet scent indicating a more severe case.

As a result, if you start noticing any strange odors or white fumes billowing from your tailpipe or water, do not drive or even try to operate your vehicle. Towing it to a reputable service center will help assess the source of the issue and, if necessary, fix the piston rings.

Defective EGR Cooler

New vehicle motors, especially diesel, use an EGR cooler to dissipate exhaust gasses as they enter the intake.

Coolant serves to keep the exhaust cool, and it is susceptible to cracking. Coolant may work its way into your tailpipe when your EGR cooler cracks. If the liquid from your tailpipe has a slightly sweet odor, it is almost certainly the consequence of a defective EGR cooler.
A faulty EGR cooler. – The Diesel Shop 

Coolant serves to keep the exhaust cool, and it is susceptible to cracking. Coolant may work its way into your tailpipe when your EGR cooler cracks. If the liquid from your tailpipe has a slightly sweet odor, it is almost certainly the consequence of a defective EGR cooler.

If you ignore this condition, you might witness your car start then die immediately; in the worst case, you’ll have a damaged engine. 

What To Do If You Encounter A Severe Problem

If you notice your car leaking an unusual amount of water on a cold day (even after you have heated your vehicle) and believe that something is way off the mark, take it to the closest service station immediately for an inspection.

As we've stated previously, your car's motor is crucial, so you should never ignore any potential problems. A maintenance specialist can go beneath your vehicle and investigate the exhaust mechanism for you. They will inform you whether you must repair the condition immediately or if you can continue to drive your automobiles as usual.
An unusual amount of water coming out of the exhaust is risky. – Oards Automotive Hub   

As we’ve stated previously, your car’s engine is crucial, so you should never ignore any potential problems. A maintenance specialist can go beneath your vehicle and investigate the exhaust mechanism for you. They will inform you whether you must repair the condition immediately or if you can continue to drive your automobiles as usual.

How Much Is The Repair Of Water Coming Out Of Exhaust?

The price depends on the replacement parts, your vehicle’s manufacturer, location, and repair center.

Piston Rings

Piston rings range in price from $30 to $150; however, service is much more expensive. It requires 1/2 to a full day to complete, and competent technicians typically charge between $100 and $200 for 60 minutes. The project’s overall price could vary between $1200 and $2300.

Head Gasket

The average cost of replacing a head seal ranges from $1000 to $2000, depending on your motor’s complexity and the service center’s service price. Likewise, because the expert will drain everything out of the engine during the operation, you should budget around $150 to change the oil and refrigerant in your car.

EGR Cooler

Based on the situation, a new EGR cooler would charge between $270 and $3700. Because the high-end side of the price spectrum is frequently designated for custom-made or high-power and efficiency motors, you’re likely to work with the affordable side of the price spectrum.

Wrapping Up 

Water coming out of exhaust, again, can be a harmless condition. Yet, if any other symptoms come along, we advise getting your car checked immediately before severe consequences occur. 

For more content like this, refer to our Fun Autopart section.

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.