Bad Oil Pump Symptoms: 5 Most Prevalent Signs And Best Ways To Fix

The oil pump is among the most important mechanical components of your car’s engine. However, the oil pumps are typically not serviced until it begins to malfunction heavily, which is too late to save your engine from severe damage. Thus, it is crucial to know the bad oil pump symptoms and deal with them from the early stage.

In today’s post, Driverevolve will introduce the 5 most common clues for a defective oil pump and the best ways to handle each case. 

What Is An Oil Pump, And How Do Oil Pumps Work? 

The oil pump is an inbuilt combustion engine component that pumps motor oil to the vehicle’s spinning bearings, pushing pistons and crankshaft.

It also supplies oil to the running motor and keeps it lubricated. This lubricant keeps the motor's metal parts from contacting one another. While your car is operating, the oil pumps soak up heat from other car parts.
An oil pump lubes all the engine’s parts. – Tuning Blog 

It also supplies oil to the running motor and keeps it lubricated. This lubricant keeps the motor’s metal parts from contacting one another. While your car is operating, the oil pumps soak up heat from other car parts.

5 Most Famous Bad Oil Pump Symptoms 

There are many symptoms of failing oil pump; Some of the most common ones are valve train sound, unusual screeches from the hydraulic lifters, low oil flow rate, an overheated engine, and a loud oil pump.

Low Oil Pressure Alert 

The oil pumps monitor the oil pressure. 

Thus, if your oil pump fails, the oil pressure in the motor begins to drop. The appearance of a low oil pressure indicator alert on your center console is typically the most evident hint of this.

If this occurs, double-check the amount of your oil. If it's too little, add extra oil until it's back to standard; If your oil level remains low, change your oil pump ASAP.
A low oil pressure alert on the dashboard signifies a malfunctioning oil pump. – Dubizzle 

If this occurs, double-check the amount of your oil. If it’s too little, add extra oil until it’s back to standard; If your oil level remains low, change your oil pump ASAP.

Engine’s Increased Temperature 

Oil lubricates the drivetrain, cooling your engine’s shifting metal parts.

Once your engine lacks oil, those metal parts touch each other and heat up. And once your car notices an unusual temperature rise, an alert on your center console will indicate that your vehicle’s temperature is too high.

When your engine overheats, it might severely harm the motor and its parts. Because repairing this level of damage will charge huge amounts of money, it’s recommended that you take your vehicle to a service engineer as soon as the alert appears.

Noisy Hydraulic Lifters 

Hydraulic lifters are critical for keeping your valve-train operational. Such parts can only operate effectively if they receive adequate lubrication. A defective oil pump may inhibit the oil flow to the stage where oil cannot travel into the car’s hydraulic lifters.

As these hydraulic lifters are not adequately lubed, they will create sounds. As a direct consequence, they will soon fall flat. The kind of oil used in a few vehicles has a significant impact on lifter sound.
If your hydraulic lifters create more sounds than usual, it is worth checking your oil pump. – J.D.Power 

As these hydraulic lifters are not adequately lubed, they will create sounds. As a direct consequence, they will soon fall flat. The kind of oil used in a few vehicles has a significant impact on lifter sound.

Valve-Train Noise

Noise can indicate many car problems; for example, rattling noises when accelerating signify an incorrect fuel-air proportion, or squeaking noises with no brake applied suggest old brake pads. 

For a bad oil pump, strange noises are also indicative. 

The valve-train mechanism contains vital parts that allow the engine to function. In addition to hydraulic lifters, the valve train includes pushing rods, gaskets, and nozzle guides. These parts rely on oil to lubricate them and ensure no friction in the mechanism.
The valve train’s sounds may also indicate potential problems. – Student Lesson 

The valve-train mechanism contains vital parts that allow the engine to function. In addition to hydraulic lifters, the valve train includes pushing rods, gaskets, and nozzle guides. These parts rely on oil to lubricate them and ensure no friction in the mechanism.

Such parts can suspend and quit functioning entirely if they are not adequately lubed because of an oil shortage. As the oil amount drops further, your valve-train system will scream and shout, producing loud and irritating sounds.

Noisy Oil Pumps 

A loud oil pump is an uncommon sign because it only yields noises when it is about to collapse. You will most likely notice a whirring or whimpering noise (similar to a bad O2 sensor) in this case, even when your vehicle is resting.

This suggests that the inbuilt cogs of your oil pumps have degraded, requiring you to change the whole pump.

What Happens When An Oil Pump Fails?

No matter how robust your oil pumps are, oil pump failures are impossible to prevent. They lead to oil pollution, escalating corrosion, and defective sucking pipes, which are detrimental to your car’s engine. 

Once oil pumps struggle, expect to encounter all of the signs listed above, which will escalate progressively and eventually result in engine collapse.

With the dramatic pressure drop, the oil pumps or bearings will be subjected to intense pressure and begin collapsing. Nothing will keep the working metal parts from contacting one another if there is no oil tension to bridge the distance between them.

Because of the friction, aggressive contact disperses enormous amounts of heat. This tension and high temperatures will completely obliterate the engine's parts and degrade the motor material.
A bad oil pump is detrimental to your car if ignored. – Oards Automotive Hub 

Because of the friction between parts, aggressive contact disperses enormous amounts of heat. This tension and high temperatures will completely obliterate the engine’s components and degrade the motor material.

Since those bearings are repeatedly under massive tension from misusing stresses, insufficient pressure will decimate the interconnect rod to the rotor shaft bearing system faster.

When such bearings fall flat, and the clearance increases, refilling oil level will be inefficient since the oil plug needed for functions cannot be reproduced, and the damaged oil pumps’ pounding will persist until your motor completely collapses.

How Much Does It Take To Replace A Bad Oil Pump? 

A replacement oil pump can charge you between $100 and $300, depending on the model and brand of your vehicle. Because this particular task requires a couple of hours to finish, service charges typically range from $200 to $300.

Thus, the oil pump replacement cost in total is usually between $300 and $600. You can always manually replace the component to reduce the expense, but a misstep may worsen the situation.

Wrapping Up 

Grasping bad oil pump symptoms will help prevent further damage to your engine and save your budget from spending thousands on engine repairs. Early diagnosis is vital; thus, seek experts’ help as soon as you notice any suspicious signs! Good luck!

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